Articles Posted in Dog Bite

According to a news report in The Real Estate Media, the average claim for dog bites has gone up by 53 percent in the last eight years. The Insurance Information Institute reports that the average dog bite claim was $29,396 in the year 2011, reflecting a considerable increase from the $19,164 average dog bite claim from the year 2004.

Princeton Dog BiteWhy are the average dog bite claims so expensive? Advanced medical care for dog bite injuries can be extremely costly and many dog bite injuries require surgical procedures to repair the damaged skin. Depending on the severity and location of the injury, it may be necessary to have a skilled plastic surgeon repair the damage. The resulting medical bills can be substantial.

Under New Jersey law, dog owners are liable for injuries caused by their pets. According to New Jersey Statute 4:19-16: “The owner of any dog which shall bite a person while such person is on or in a public place, or lawfully on or in a private place, including the property of the owner of the dog, shall be liable for such damages as may be suffered by the person bitten, regardless of the former viciousness of such dog or the owner’s knowledge of such viciousness.”

An 18-year-old woman was injured in a New Jersey dog attack when her own pit bull bit her more than 20 times. According to The Star Ledger, the dog bite incident occurred on Fernwood Terrace in Elizabeth. Officials say she was in her bedroom when her dog “went crazy” and starting biting her. She made it outside where someone called the police. A detective who responded to the call fatally shot the dog after it turned on him. The woman had no feeling in her right arm and couldn’t move one of her fingers. The dog reportedly attacked five people in Morris County in 2008 before being rescued by the woman.

Pit bull advocates often say that it is not the breed but the owner that makes a dog dangerous. While this may be true for many dogs, it appears that pit bulls are simply more capable of doing serious damage than other animals. According to DogsBite.org, pit bulls were responsible for 71 percent of all fatal dog bites in 2011 despite only making up five percent of the total United States dog population.

In the year 2011, eight dog owners were killed by their own pets. Seven of those fatalities involved a pit bull. Together, pit bulls (22 attacks) and Rottweilers (four attacks), the number two lethal dog breed, accounted for 84 percent of all fatal attacks in 2011. In the seven-year period from 2005 to 2011, this same combination accounted for 74 percent (157) of the 213 total recorded deaths.

Pit bull and Rottweiler activists often claim that it is not the breed of the dog but the quality of the owner that determines whether a dog is dangerous or not. While an attentive owner can keep a dog calm and well behaved, it doesn’t change the fact that some dogs are simply capable of doing more harm than others.

New Jersey Dog Bite DangerDogsBite.org, a national advocacy group for dog bite victims, recently released dog attack statistics for the United States in the year 2011. While not all pit bulls are dangerous, the numbers do not lie. Despite only making up five percent of the U.S. dog population, pit bulls were involved in 71 percent of the 31 fatal dog attacks reported last year. Pit bulls are as dangerous to their owners as they are to others. In fact, 88 percent of the dog owners who were fatally injured by their own pets were killed by a pit bull. They are not, however, the only dangerous breed.

The Rottweiler is the other breed most often involved in fatal attacks. Between the years 2005 and 2011, pit bulls and Rottweilers together accounted for a combined 73 percent of all dog bite-related deaths. In other words, a pit bull or a Rottweiler was involved in 156 of the 213 fatal dog attacks over the past seven years.

New Jersey Dog Bite InsuranceUnder New Jersey law, dog owners can be held liable for the damages their pets cause. If you have been injured by a dog in New Jersey, you may be wondering who will pay for your medical bills and other damages.

In a number of cases, the compensation for injuries and damages in a dog bite case come from the dog owner’s homeowners insurance policy.

Insurance companies and defense attorneys may attempt to convey the image that any award for a victim will come out of the dog owner’s bank account. This is not necessarily the truth. Many dog owners include their dog on their homeowner insurance. In such cases, any claim against the dog owner will be covered by his or her insurance policy.

A 5-year-old girl was recently injured in a New Jersey dog attack involving a pit bull. According to a news report in The Jersey Journal, the dog bite accident occurred on Fulton Avenue in Jersey City. Officials say the girl was walking with her mother when the pit bull opened a gate and attacked the girl. She suffered puncture wounds, cuts, and a possibly fractured shinbone. The dog was impounded and the owner has been cited for having an unlicensed dog.

Under New Jersey law, dog owners are responsible for the actions of their pet. New Jersey Statute 4:19-16 states: “The owner of any dog which shall bite a person while such person is on or in a public place, or lawfully on or in a private place, including the property of the owner of the dog, shall be liable for such damages as may be suffered by the person bitten, regardless of the former viciousness of such dog or the owner’s knowledge of such viciousness.”

Victims of dog bites must prove that he or she suffered losses in the dog attack and that he or she was not trespassing at the time of the dog bite incident. In such cases, compensation may be available for the victim’s medical bills, hospitalization, and other related dog attack damages.

dog_aggressive_4464403.jpgIf you or a loved one has been injured in a New Jersey dog attack, you may be wondering who can be held responsible for your losses and how you can receive compensation for your injuries and other damages. New Jersey is a statutory strict liability state. This means that New Jersey dog owners are responsible for the actions of their pet, whether or not the dog had previously shown signs of vicious behavior.

N.J.S.A 4:19-16 states: “The owner of any dog which shall bite a person while such person is on or in a public place, or lawfully on or in a private place, including the property of the owner of the dog, shall be liable for such damages as may be suffered by the person bitten, regardless of the former viciousness of such dog or the owner’s knowledge of such viciousness.” This means that a dog owner is responsible for the injuries his or her dog causes as long as the victim was not committing a crime at the time of the incident.

In order to prove liability, victims of New Jersey dog attack injuries must show that the defendant owned the dog, the dog caused the injuries, and he or she was in a public place or legally on private property. To prevent these types of incidents, all New Jersey dog owners have it in their best interest to keep their dogs indoors, post “beware of dog” signs, and always keep their dog on a leash. A number of New Jersey dog attacks occur because dog owners allow their pets to run loose.

Victims of New Jersey dog bite accidents have the right to pursue financial compensation for their injuries under the state’s strict liability statute. New Jersey Statute 4:19-16 states, “The owner of any dog which shall bite a person while such person is on or in a public place, or lawfully on or in a private place, including the property of the owner of the dog, shall be liable for such damages as may be suffered by the person bitten, regardless of the former viciousness of such dog or the owner’s knowledge of such viciousness.” Pursuing compensation for a New Jersey dog attack becomes more complicated when it is not clear who owns the dog.

In cases involving a stray dog, injured victims may still be able to pursue financial compensation for their suffering. A skilled dog bite attorney can work with investigators to help determine who was responsible for the dog getting loose in the first place. Victims of stray dogs with no known owner may seek compensation for the attack through their own insurance policy.

An experienced personal injury attorney can help a victim of a dog bite injury determine what their best options may be. Whether it is through civil litigation or an insurance claim, victims should be able to seek support for their financial, physical, and emotional losses. Damages that may be covered following an accident include losses such as hospital bills, the cost of rabies treatment, physical therapy fees, prescription drug costs, lost wages, and past and future suffering.

New Jersey dog bite attacks can result in not only serious physical injuries, but can also have a significant emotional and psychological impact on victims. Anyone who has been severely bitten by a dog is often left wondering how they will pay for their mounting medical bills and lost wages. Fortunately, under New Jersey law, dog owners may be held accountable for the injuries and related losses their pets cause. Injured victims of dog bite attacks would be well-advised to seek legal guidance from an experienced attorney who can help them secure fair compensation for their injuries, damages, and losses.

Under New Jersey Statute 4:19-16: “The owner of any dog which shall bite a person while such person is on or in a public place, or lawfully on or in a private place, including the property of the owner of the dog, shall be liable for such damages as may be suffered by the person bitten, regardless of the former viciousness of such dog or the owner’s knowledge of such viciousness.”

To pursue compensation through civil litigation, a victim will have to prove that the defendant owns the dog, that the dog injured them, and that the victim was not trespassing or provoking the animal at the time of the attack. It is common for dog owners to deny responsibility for the actions of their pets. So, injured victims often have to resort to civil litigation in order to receive fair compensation.

Children are particularly vulnerable to dangerous dog bite injuries. Whenever a child is attacked by a vicious dog, there is the potential for catastrophic injuries or even death. It is important to not only protect children from potentially dangerous dogs, but also to teach them how to be safe around dogs in general. Here are some dog safety tips that adults can practice as well.

It is important to never approach an unleashed dog that you do not know. Additionally, dogs that are nursing, eating or sleeping should not be bothered. If a potentially dangerous dog approaches you, it is in your best interest to stay still. Running away may provoke the dog to chase you. Making eye contact with the animal may make the animal feel nervous or threatened. If the dog does attack, it is best to remain still or to even lie like a log.

It is best not to approach strange dogs. If you know the dog or if the owner is nearby and you are about to pet the dog, it is important to let the dog sniff your hand first. Any sudden movements or unwanted touching may startle the animal. Children need to be taught that dogs do not like being hugged or pulled.

For the first time since 1997, a person has been killed by rabies in New Jersey. According to The Bergen County Record, a 73-year-old woman died after a dog bite attack. Authorities believe the woman came in contact with rabies while in her native country of Haiti back in April 2011. She began to develop symptoms of the deadly virus on June 25, 2011, in New Jersey. It is not clear exactly what caused her to have the fatal virus or if medical professionals should have been able to prevent her tragic passing.

Rabies is typically transmitted through a scratch or bite from an infected animal. To help prevent the spread of this potentially lethal virus, dog owners are required have their pets registered and vaccinated. Rabies is a treatable virus but it must be properly diagnosed early. If rabies goes untreated, it may result in a fatal infection of the brain called encephalitis.

Under New Jersey Statutes 4:19-16: “The owner of any dog which shall bite a person while such person is on or in a public place, or lawfully on or in a private place, including the property of the owner of the dog, shall be liable for such damages as may be suffered by the person bitten, regardless of the former viciousness of such dog or the owner’s knowledge of such viciousness.” This means that dog owners are responsible for the damages their pet causes, including the spreading of rabies.